Anatomy

Gluteus Maximus: Functional Anatomy Guide

The gluteus maximus (G. gloutos, buttock. L. maximus, largest.) is not only the largest buttock muscle, but the largest muscle in the human body, period. Its main responsibility is hip extension, and it’s classified as part of the superficial gluteal region. The gluteus maximus is the outermost buttock muscle. It lies superficial to the gluteus minimus and the …

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Different Body Types: Ectomorph Mesomorph Endomorph

Different Body Types: Are You An Ectomorph, Endomorph, or Mesomorph?

The three different body types (also called somatotypes) include the ectomorph, endomorph, and mesomorph. On this page, you’ll learn how to determine your body type so that you can make your genetics work for you – not against you. Each of the three body types has its strengths and weaknesses… …And so, you must take …

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Lateral Deltoid: Functional Anatomy Guide

The lateral deltoid (L. latus, side ; deltoides, triangular) is the outermost head of the deltoid and is primarily responsible for performing shoulder abduction. The lateral deltoid is part of the scapulohumeral (intrinsic shoulder) muscle group. It is situated between the anterior and posterior deltoid, and lies superficial to the insertions of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor. It originates from the acromion process on …

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Pectoralis Major: Functional Anatomy Guide

The pectoralis major (L. pectus, chest ; major, larger.) is a large, fan-shaped chest muscle. It acts on the shoulder and (indirectly on) the scapula, with its most prominent role being the prime mover in shoulder horizontal adduction. The pec major is the largest and most superficial of the anterior axioappendicular muscles, lying superficial to the entire pectoralis minor …

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Quadriceps Femoris: Functional Anatomy Guide

As is made explicit by its Latin translation, the quadriceps femoris (L. quattuor, four ; caput, head ; femoris, femur.) literally means the four-headed muscle of the femur, or thigh. The four heads of the quadriceps femoris – or simply the quadriceps – include the following: rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius and vastus medialis. The primary …

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