Barbell Step Up

Exercise Name:
Name: Barbell Step Up (non-alternating)
Muscles Worked:
Primary: Quadriceps
Secondary: Calves, Glutes, Hamstrings, Hip Adductors
Classification:
Function: Strength
Mechanics: Compound
Force: Push
Equipment:
Main: Barbell
Ancillary: Box, Power rack
Guidelines:
Experience: Intermediate
Rep Range: 5-12
Training Tempo: 1 – 0 – 1 – 0
Related Exercises:
Variations: Alternating Step Up, Dumbbell Step Up, Explosive Step Up, High Step Up
Alternatives: Bulgarian Split Squat, Split Squat, Lunge, Single-Leg Leg Press, Pistol

Instructions with Pictures

Note: Pictures coming soon!

1. Starting Position

  • Use a wide overhand grip to grasp bar; support bar on upper traps.
  • Unrack bar from outside of power rack.
  • Stand ~12-18 inches in front of box, with feet hip width apart.
  • Raise leg and put foot on box such that thigh is parallel to floor (keep foot here until you switch sides).
  • Assume a neutral spine and upright torso for the duration of the lift.

2. Concentric Repetition

  • Extend leading knee and hip to step up on box, bringing trailing foot down next to leading foot.

3. Midpoint

  • Don’t pause. Once trailing foot has landed on box, immediately commence eccentric rep.

4. Eccentric Repetition

  • Flex leading knee and hip while reaching trailing leg back to step down into the starting position.

5. Repeat

  • Repeat the motion for the desired number of reps. Then switch legs and complete the same number of reps. Once both sides are done, you’ve finished one set.
  • I’ve found that 5-12 reps yields the best results. I stay below 5 reps since heavier loads interfere with balance, which makes using good form increasingly difficult.

Common Barbell Step Up Errors to Avoid

Mistake: Solution:
Using trailing leg Don’t cheat by pushing off the trailing leg. All the power should from the leading leg.
Leaning forward Keep your torso as upright as is possible. Make sure your hips are square; directly under and supporting, your torso. Don’t allow them to tilt anteriorly (i.e. butt out, big lower back arch).
Hunching over Keep your chest up, and tighten your abs and lower back. Look straight ahead (except to watch your step!). As said earlier, your spine should remain neutral throughout the lift.

Barbell Step Up Tips

  1. Drive through the heel of your leading foot; not throught the ball of the foot. This provides the most efficient transfer of energy from your body and into the box.
  2. The knee and foot of the front leg should be straight forward throughout the step up movement. Don’t turn them inward or outward.
  3. Vary the distance between you and the step to emphasize different muscles. A longer stride targets the glutes more, while a shorter stride focuses more on the quads.
  4. Change the height of the box to emphasize different muscles. A higher step works the glutes more, while a shorter step hits the quads harder.
  5. Use a bench if you don’t have a box. Just make sure it’s stable and can safely hold your weight plus the weight of the bar.
  6. Use the barbell step up as an assistance movement for the squat. Implement in your routine after squats; or have it be your main leg exercise during a “light” lower body training session.

Is This Exercise Right for You?

This exercise is best for intermediate & advanced lifters looking for increased leg mass, strength and symmetry.

It also has applications for experienced lifters looking to bust squat plateaus and improve balance.

Beginners, on the other hand, should stick to basic leg exercises. Master squats and lunges before trying step ups. Unfortunately, as a beginner, you lack the base strength, balance and proprioception needed to get a worthwhile results from the movement.

You should think of avoiding the barbell step up if you have any inhibitive ankle, knee or lower back issues as well as any other leg-related hinderances (e.g. hamstring strain).

About the Author Alex

Hey! My name is Alex, and I'm the owner and author of King of the Gym. I started this website back in late 2009 during college, and it has been my pet project ever since. My goal is to help you learn proper weight training and nutrition principles so that you can get strong and build the physique of your dreams!

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Leave a Comment:

1 comment
Juan says July 30, 2015

According to http://www.overspeedtraining.com/legsart.htm the heavy step up is actually lower risk to injure than the squat. What is your opinion on this ? Especially for someone struggling with a recurring SI Joint injury.

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